Archive for the ‘tsukemono (漬け物)’ Category

How to Make Nukazuke: Fermenting Nukadoko

How to Make Nukazuke: Fermenting the Nukadoko (Nuka Bed) ぬか床の発酵 How to Make Nukazuke: Fermenting the Nukadoko (Nuka Bed) ぬか床の発酵
Nukazuke Report: Our nukadoko is coming along well. The season is cold now so fermenting took some time. I added half a can of Japan’s best beer: Yona Yona Ale and kept the pickle pot warmish for a few days. We added a lot of turnip greens, not to eat…

How to Make Nukazuke: Nukadoko Pickling Bed

How to Make Nukazuke: Nukadoko (Nuka Bed) ぬか床の作り方 How to Make Nukazuke: Nukadoko (Nuka Bed) ぬか床の作り方
We have some favorite shops in Kyoto for nukazuke tsukemono pickles but really wanted to be able to make our own at home. Traditionally every household in Japan made their own pickles, still many do. Nukazuke is quick and easy to make once you have a pickling pot full of fermenting ‘…

Tsukemono: Aka Kabura Nukazuke from Nishiki Market

Nukazuke: Japanese Rice Bran Fermented Pickles 京漬物 錦・高倉屋 Tsukemono: Aka Kabura Nukazuke from Nishiki Market 京漬物 錦・高倉屋
Meet nukazuke, a traditional Japanese tsukemono that is fermented in rice bran with a bit of salt. Nukazuke is full of vitamins and can be extremely pungent. Most any kind of vegetable can be used, even meat can be pickled by this method! It is easy to make at home and…

Shiokara Report: Enjoying Homemade Squid Shiokara

Shiokara Report: Enjoying Homemade Squid Shiokara
Shiokara Report: Enjoying Homemade Chinmi Squid Shiokara いかの塩辛 Shiokara Report: Enjoying Homemade Chinmi Squid Shiokara いかの塩辛
Shiokara is a favorite of Miwa and she made some recently and it is ready for eating. Shiokawa is made of salted squid semi-fermented in its own guts and is a kind of chinmi, literally ‘rare taste’. Japanese like shiokara on rice or with sake.…

Itadakimono: Maru Daikon and Shinmai

Itadakimono: Maru Daikon and Shinmai
Itadakimono: Maru Daikon and Shinmai (Round Daikon Radish and New Rice) 頂き物: 丸大根と新米 Itadakimono: Maru Daikon and Shinmai (頂き物: 丸大根と新米)
Giving and receiving gifts is an essential aspect of Japanese culture. Gifts are usually small and often given spontaneously. On the way back from an appointment today I stopped in at Kisen to return a very old and precious book on Kyo-ryori to the owner that I…
Pages: Prev 1 2 3 Next

ContactCopyright © Kyoto Foodie: Where and what to eat in Kyoto, All Rights Reserved.