Archive for the ‘wagashi (和菓子)’ Category

Wagashi (和菓子) is the traditional confection of Japan that developed with the tea ceremony. Wagashi come in a myriad of types and most are made with sweetened beans, mochi and/or fruit. The theme is always natural beauty and often have a reference to a classical poem or painting. Kyoto’s famous kyogashi (京菓子) are considered the pinnacle of sophistication and refinement in Japan.

Wagashi: Suetomi Kyoto Tea Ceremony Namagashi

Wagashi: Suetomi Kyoto Tea Ceremony Namagashi
Wagashi: Suetomi Kyoto Tea Ceremony Namagashi Wagashi: Suetomi Kyoto Tea Ceremony Namagashi
The finest wagashi for the tea ceremony are sweets for the mind, the motifs come from classical poetry and painting.…

Wagashi: Wasanbon Sugar Sesame Mochi

Wagashi: Wasanbon Sugar Sesame Mochi
Rakanmochi: Wasanbon Sugar Sesame Mochi (羅漢餅) Rakanmochi: Wasanbon Sugar Sesame Mochi (羅漢餅)
Rakanmochi is sesame flavored mochi encased in a firm but dry and crumbly block of Japanese wasanbon sugar and requires a slight bit of excavation in order to enjoy.…

Wagashi: Daimonji and Chofu

Wagashi: Daimonji and Chofu
Daimonji and Chofu: Pay Your Taxes in Wagashi! Coming Soon: Daimonji
It’s chofu, a waffle wrapper with gooey gyuhi inside — and it has a ‘大’ branded on it. What the heck is this all about?…

Wagashi: Ayugashi or Waka-ayu Sweetfish Shaped Confection

Wagashi: Ayugashi or Waka-ayu Sweetfish Shaped Confection
This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Do Not Miss
Wagashi: Ayugashi or Waka-ayu, Early Summer Sweetfish (Ayu) Shaped Confection (鮎菓子 若鮎) Wagashi: Ayugashi or Waka-ayu, Early Summer Sweetfish (Ayu) Shaped Confection (鮎菓子 若鮎) Meet ayugashi! A river fish shaped confection with waffle for a skin, bubbly soft mochi for innards and facial and fin features branded on with hot iron.…

Wagashi: Early Summer Loquat (Biwa) Namagashi

Wagashi: Early Summer Loquat (Biwa) Namagashi
Wagashi: Early Summer Biwa (Loquat) Namagashi 枇杷 (びわ) 生菓子 Wagashi: Early Summer Loquat (Biwa) Namagashi 枇杷(びわ)生菓子 As early summer becomes midsummer, the days muggy and the nights no longer cool, the loquat, or biwa in Japanese, is a common sight in Kyoto; both in discount supermarkets and fine fruit boutiques and on the streets and sidewalks, fallen from large leafed trees overhanging a walled garden — and…
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