KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party – Sake Kasu Roll Cake and Doburoku Sake

Thank You! Thank You! Thank You! KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party – Sake Kasu Roll Cake and Doburoku Sake

KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake
Things in my homeland grew so bad over the last 8 years that we had to reject a real patriot who we could have chosen for president 8 years ago and bet on this newcomer with precious little experience and no resumé to be president. Well, Barack Obama delivered on his soaring rhetoric, won big and took the reigns of government with confidence and distinction. Here in Kyoto we tuned-in late night to the inaugural live stream and toasted him in and his post-partisan, post-cultural war vision with the equivalent of Japanese moonshine – doburoku!

KyotoFoodie Toasts President Obama
I was not a believer during most of the campaign, but Barack Obama really grew through out the campaign and by the time of the economic crash and first presidential debate, he looked and acted presidential. Watching him take the oath, I felt grateful to him, for at the very least, inspiring hope in people when the situation looks pretty grim.

The little foodie party that we had planned got even littler when everyone realized that the inauguration was going to be in the middle of the night in Japan. We watched the swearing in and inaugural address and toasted with bubbly ‘home-brewed’ doburoku sake. After the speech we retired to the parlor for more doburoku and some awesome roll cake that Miwa scored. And finally, incense and prayers before bed.

Omaba Inaugural Address Live Stream
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

Toasting Hope and Post-partisanship
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake
(While humming, ‘Then I’ll get on my knees and pray, We don’t get fooled again.’)

Toasting Hope and Post-partisanship
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

Toasting Hope and Post-partisanship
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

The Beagle Drinks to President Obama
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

KyotoFoodie ‘Mini’ Inaugural Gala

Doburoku Sake and Sake Kasu Roll Cake
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

Doburoku ‘Home Brewed’ Sake
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

About the Sake: Doburoku
I had wanted to get champagne but decided on a bubbly and rather chunky doburoku that we first introduced on KyotoFoodie in this Mackerel Yuzu Pepper Nabe article last winter. This sake comes from Nagano Prefecture in north-central Japan and is called Domuroku (Domuroku is the product name).

Traditionally doburoku is home-brewed sake, in centuries past this is the sake that people drank at home, they made it themselves, the same as their tsukemono, miso and so on. Now home-brewing of sake is illegal, but in the last few years doburoku style sake is being made and sold by quality sake producers and consumers are literally drinking it up!

Doburoku ‘Home Brewed’ Sake – Bubbles
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake

Sake Kasu Roll Cake
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake
In the very center the sake kasu can be seen. It is flavored delicately with honey.

About the Cake: Sake Kasu Roll Cake
Roll cake is big in Japan, there are countless variations. My favs in Kyoto are maccha roll cake and Tamba black bean roll cake. This was a new one though. One of Kyoto’s big sake breweries, Kizakura got together with a pâtisserie in Kobe. Kobe is known for it’s good and very Western oriented style. This roll cake is flavored with sake kasu, or the lees that are left after pressing sake. Sake kasu is used in many popular winter dishes in Japan, this was my first experience with it in Western sweets. It was flavored with honey and the combination was just perfect. The pungent, fermented kasu contrasts so nicely with the mellow sweetness of the honey, all wrapped up in cream and sponge cake.

Sake Kasu Roll Cake – detail
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake
The outside of the roll cake reminded me of frost or fresh-fallen snow, on cake!

The Gourmet Beagle Samples Sake Kasu Roll Cake
KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party - Sake Kasu Rollcake and Doburoku Sake
(and approves!)

Links

Doburoku Sake (Japanese language)
Endo Sake Brewery 遠藤酒造場
‘Domuroku’ Sake どむろく

Sake Kasu Roll Cake
Kizakura Sake Brewery (English website)
Limited Edition Sake Kasu Roll Cake 酒かすろーる

9 Responses to “KyotoFoodie Obama Inauguration Party – Sake Kasu Roll Cake and Doburoku Sake”

  1. Mora says:

    Greetings to all. Thanks for this latest addition to your site. Great photos and information as always. I am grateful that food and drink are much easier to share and discuss than politics. Wish we could have had some doburoku to celebrate with on January 20. We live not too far from SakeOne brewery in Forest Grove, OR. I’ll have to check with them about doburoku and if they ever have it or would consider making it. The Murai Tokubetsu Honjozo they import is excellent. Sadly, they do not sell their kasu, but I’m told that if you time it right and know who to talk to you that you can get it.

  2. Peko-P says:

    Hello Mora,

    So, you don’t have a foodie blog? I bet you would be a great foodie blogger!

    As always, thanks much for stopping by KyotoFoodie! I am counting on President Obama to make American politics as easy to discuss and share as food and drink!

    Doburoku is really popular in Japan the last few years and lots of breweries are selling it. Legally it is more complicated to make and sell than filtered sake (seishu). I would imagine in the US that the legal difference between filtered and ‘moonshine’ sake is non-existent. Doburoku is basically sake moromi (mash), the brewery doesn’t even have to press it. Easy!

    In Japan, if you ask the brewery, they will often give you kasu, but your are right, timing is essential. If you call and ask a few times, they might give you some special kasu. Tell ‘em you’re a foodie!

  3. Mora says:

    Hello again, Peko. Thanks much for the compliment…and suggestion…about food blogging. It actually may be in my future in conjunction with a very dear friend who lives a bit north of Kyoto. I’ll share more about that should/when the time is right.

    You’re right about the legal difference between filtered and moonshine sake in the US. To the best of my knowledge there is none. In fact, shochu is considered the same as sake when it comes to an alcohol license…which I don’t understand since shochu can have a much higher alcohol content. I’ve yet to develop a palate for the stuff, but maybe I need to have the right tutor!

    I don’t work on Fridays, so I think I’ll be heading over to SakeOne today to talk about doburoku and pick up some more of the Murai family’s Tokubestu Honjozu. I finished the bottle last night with a fresh cinnamon-brown sugar Hoddeok [http://www.lastappetite.com/korean-street-food-recipes-hoddeok/] that I made. It was a great combination.

  4. Peko-P says:

    Hi again, Mora,

    I am interested to hear that you learn about doburoku and sake kasu there.

    I am surprised that you like honjozo. I have never had one that I liked, too much distilled alcohol taste for me.

    Have you had namagenshu before? That extinguished my passion for daiginjo last year.

  5. Mora says:

    I have had namagenshu in Japan and liked it very much. At SakeOne they make a namazake but it is not always available, though, and I do not remember if it is genshu or maybe junmai, ginjo or what. I fear that many American sake drinkers do not understand…yet…the finer qualities of sake and the many ways it is available. The style of sake I prefer is dry to very dry…+2 and higher on the sake meter value (SMV)…and with some lactic acid. Anything sweet is not to my liking. And I especially do not like nigori. Many Americans first trying sake cold will order nigori. For me it is like riding a sanrinsha, or in other words, sake on training wheels. It is too sweet and I don’t like the cloudy/milky look to it. Last week we bought a bottle of the Murai Family Champion Daiginjo, winner of a gold medal at the 2008 Japan National New Sake competition. It is made from Yamadanishiki, polish to 35%, and +4 SMV. We’re very excited to try it soon. I haven’t decided what to serve with it but most likely it will be with a nabe, maybe Dungeness Crab if I can find it fresh. Dungeness Crab is found from San Francisco north to British Columbia, Canada. It is my favorite crab because it has a beautiful sweet taste. And of course some haiga rice made in the donabe.

    Until our next meal together online…all the best. – Mora

  6. Sanada says:

    Hello, Peko-P-san. Kanpai for Obama with doburoku looks nice. He must go to Japan to get real sake (surely he would say “Yes, we can”). Here Minnesota, instead of doburoku, there is nigorizake as well as ordinary junmai ginjou. It’s not bad at all, but I always miss Japan when I read your blog…. Please keep updating. Cheers!

  7. Peko-P says:

    Beagle Obamacon Oishii
    Oishii means delicious.

  8. IanM says:

    how about a recipe for that homebrew?

  9. Will Auld says:

    Peko-P,

    Hi, just doing a little look see on Doburoku and stumbled on this post.

    I need, really… need, to comment on the discussion. As Nora, I live pretty close to SakeOne and love the Murai family Tokubetsu Honjozo. It is very delicate. I also tried SakeOne’s nama about a month ago and was blown away. I enjoy their genshu G but am not a supper fan of their standard series. Tasting this nama was a very nice surprise. It may vary from time to time but the one I had was a nama junmai ginjo genshu. Wow, that is kind of like ordering at Starbucks :-)

    A correction though, Shochu is not legally the same as sake here in Oregon. You can not buy it at a regular store like you can sake, wine and beer. You can only buy it through the Oregon liqueur stores. This much I know for sure. As for restaurants / bars I assume that the same restrictions would apply and you would need a license that specifically covers more than sake, wine and beer.

    Thanks!

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